Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Vacuum Sealing Corn on the Cob with Husks On

Do you support your local Farmer's Market? We do! Even though we raise a garden every year, we still make numerous visits to our town square to buy veggies that we didn't raise or didn't do well. This year the corn and beets were no shows so off to the square we went early one Saturday morning. The early bird gets the worm...or in this case...the corn! We are so fortunate to have as many vendors as we do with the crowds coming out like they do. Buying locally raised corn at this point is pretty much over. The weather didn't help anyone's growing season this year.

Normally, we blanch, cool, vacuum seal and freeze our corn. It's a pretty time consuming task. Last year my brother was telling us about how he was freezing his with the husk on. We tried it, we liked it and it's a whole lot easier! If you don't have a vacuum sealer, you just don't know what you are missing! There is no freezer bag out there that can even remotely compete with vacuum sealing. Everything we've ever frozen in this manner tastes as good as fresh even two years later.


Part of the 8 dozens of Peaches and Cream we froze to enjoy all through 2012-2013.

Chop both ends of the corn off. We place 6 normal sized ears in a 1 gallon vacuum seal freezer bag.

Evenly distribute corn in the bag. The more uniform it is, the better it will seal. Carefully center bag opening over the gasket.

Close door, lock unit and seal! We froze 16 packs of corn which will barely get us until Memorial Day next year. We are some grilled corn eating folks!

HINT: Be sure to thaw your packs completely before you shuck it. It makes silk and husk removal a lot easier.




21 comments:

  1. ok did this, checked freezer 4 days later and all the bags had expanded, puffed up and freezer top was popped open, baskets jostled around! what happened?!

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  2. OMG! I have never heard of such a thing! We have been vacuum sealing corn this way for two summers now and have never run into this problem and we put up a lot of corn this way. I'm away from home right now or I'd email you a picture of our freezer to prove it. The only two explanations I can come up woth for something this drastic is 1: your freezer was off for several days or 2: you are pulling my leg. Vacuum sealing when done properly removes all air. I personally have never seen vacuum sealed bags expand. Especially to the point that it raises the top of a freezer. I'm so sorry this has happened to you. I do not post anything unless we are successful with it. Please email me a picture and I'll ask around.

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    1. I looked on the food saver site and it says brocolli, cabbage, cauliflower and brussell sprouts give off a gas and are not recommended to vacuum seal. Corn is not listed in that category. If you find a bag of frozen veggies that are loose, then it's not a bad seal, but a food that gives off gas and expanded is what the site says. We put up Peaches and Cream corn the two years before and Delectable this year (looks just like P&C) and this has never happened. It always tastes as fresh as if just picked. What type of corn did you put up? how long after you picked the corn did you put it up? I have very limited access to the internet right now, but I would like to know more details. Again, I only post what is successful for us.

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  3. thx for your comments...I agree it was the wierdest thing! I came around the corner to the freezer and saw it popped open and all the baskets jostled around...first thought someone had gotten in it but then saw all the pkgs! Picked it early 6am monday morning,it was cool out and some of the ears just dripped with water when I cut off the ends...think it is also peaches and cream variety. It was all cut up and ready to bag in a couple of hours, I brought it into A/C house and worked on bagging it off and on the rest of the morning, vacuum sealing most and zip locking rest.Then straight into freezer.... found the freezer Fri evening so don't know how long it had been open. My plan now is to poke hole in bag and try to reseal not vac seal since the zip loc bags aren't entirely airtight. With the husks still on am guessing corn is protected? Please don't worry about your advice, I did this before finding your blog on suggestion of a friend and was exasperatedly looking for advice!!! It must be the gas thing. thx so much for responding, still havent been able to find anything on net about this....so kooky! lol... will try to send pic, but it looks like those little air pillows you get in shipping pkgs... with corn inside! lol

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  4. For years Andy used to bag his whole, unshucked in trash bags and freeze the ears of corn. Then we went to shucking, blanching and vacuum sealing. Then someone told us they cut both ends off, left the husks on and ziplocked them. We thought we would try that but vacuum seal them. I promise you, we put up so many packs this way and have never had this problem. We have been racking our brains all day trying to figure out how so much of it would react that way. OMG! I feel so bad for you. We put up to SAVE MONEY and eat as fresh as possible all year long. We have had nothing but success with this and we do it exactly like you said you do it. Your results were so extreme, I really thought one of our friends were pulling our leg...they've been known to do that! Is the corn frozen? I hope you are able to salvage it. Let me know how it goes. my personal email is lifeisgood@energize.net.

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  5. Hi Denise, I have really enjoyed wandering around your site and all the great info. Well I just finished clipping the edges of the bags, squishing out the air and re-sealing-no vacum. some bags have alot of ice crystals,wondering if extra moisture was the problem. we have two freezers so was able to move things around and none of the corn thawed. Think I'm Ok. thx for the sympathy!

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  6. I hope it all works out for you and that none of your corn and hard work goes to waste. I can't imagine going out to our freezers and seeing what you saw.

    I hope you'll sign up and follow my blog. I've got tons of great recipes to share and since hubby has to work the next several weekends, I might get caught up on some posting! :-) Keep in touch!

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  7. Denise, when you cook blanched corn on the cob that has been vacuum sealed, do you just put it in boiling water in the bag for 5-7 minutes?

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    1. I believe you would want to remove it from the bag and them place the ears (unshucked of course) into the boiling water. You will want to thaw the corn before cooking it also.

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  8. I let the corn thaw in the bag and then drop the corn in a pot of boiling water and cook until tender (about 5-7 minutes like you said). I have not tried boiling the corn in the bag. We love oven baked and grilled corn so much, we rarely boil it anymore. Refer to:http://manthatstuffisgood.blogspot.com/2012/02/grilled-corn.html

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    1. Denise: I cooked some of the corn tonight that we put up back in October. I went ahead and cooked it in the vacuum sealed bag and it really turned out good. I cooked it 7 minutes in boiling water. It was so sweet and juicy. Nothing was boiled out of the corn into the water. Fantastic!

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  9. I'm so glad that worked out for you! We have already started enjoying the corn we put up too. It's so delicious.

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  10. Hey,I have really enjoyed all the great informaion and appreciate this.
    Cooking Vacuum Bags

    Thanks a lot!!!!!

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  11. OH Really ........That is new information for me and i never heard of such a thing!
    Buste Goffrate

    Thanks for that@@@@@@@@@

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  12. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  13. Denise, Thanks for this great tip. I knew that I could do this but all info on the interweb says to shuck, par-boil, ice bath, then vacuum pack. Well, that turns the corn soft and slightly to soft for my liking. Now I know that my idea will work.
    You should try cooking corn like this, it works every time and is soooo good. Heat the oven to 350 degrees, use heavy duty aluminum foil, put your fresh ear of corn on the foil. butter your ear any way you want. Sometimes I'll add chopped peppers to the butter. Mostly I'll use plain butter, salt and pepper. Wrap the ear up in the foil and twist the ends to seal in all the goodness and place on the oven rack, using the bars of the rack to space out all the ears you are cooking. 35-40 minutes the corn is done. Unwrap the ears, put em on the serving plate and use all the melted butter to drench the ears of corn. Get plenty of napkins, find a comfortable place to sit, and enjoy the sweetest, most delicious summer veggie.
    By not cooking it in boiling water, you don't loose ANY flavors in the pot.

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  14. Nick, thanks for sharing! We fix our corn that way very frequently. However I haven't tried adding peppers. That's a new one on me and I'll have to try it.

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  15. Can I still do this if the shucks have a little bit of black mildew on them? The moisture content was really high when I got them, and they've got mildew growing on the outside. I'm assuming the cobs inside are still ok. What would you recommend?

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  16. I have the same problem when vacuum sealing corn on the cob. I even tried wrapping the corn with the husk still on it with aluminum foil and then vacuum seal it but it still blew up like a balloon after about three hours. I tried three or four different vacuum bags,but still ballooned up.I have been vacuum sealing for a long time,but this is the first time i have tried it with corn on the cob with no success.Would appreciate any feed back. thank you

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  17. I often use Foodsaver V2244 to preserve corn, the machine that cheap and very helpful. I don't have to worry about the way to keep food fresh any more.

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  18. Really impressive! I don’t have a vacuum sealer but it seems as a very handy thing! Thanks for the post! Love it!

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