Tuesday, January 10, 2012

Grilled Pork Ribs

Over the years Andy and I have fixed ribs just about every way you can imagine. There's nothing better than ribs, potato salad, cowboy beans and grilled corn. We've smoked them on the pit and the Bubba Keg (see below) and the gas grill. The times will vary some because of the cuts of the meat and how steady the temperature remains. The main thing to remember is low and slow!

The first thing I recommend is getting a big kitchen garbage bag and laying it out on your counter for all the prep work. (You'll thank me when it comes to clean up time.)

GRILL INSTRUCTIONS:
We normally fix Baby Back ribs on the grill and leave the St. Louis ribs to smoke on the pit or Bubba Keg. Since we were cooking out on a work night the other night, we veered a little and fixed trimmed up St. Louis ribs for my niece and her family on the grill.


Rinse meat 
Strip silver membrane off the back (This will not dissolve if you leave it on!) 
Rub meat down with yellow mustard, covering every part of the meat, even the sides.

Rub meat down with a dry rub. Right now we are hooked on McCormick's Applewood rub.  

Place on a hot grill (400 degrees). Sear both sides and turn until you get a nice color on the outside. (About 10-15 minutes total).

Wrap and then double wrap tightly in aluminum foil. 

Be sure to seal the edges so the juices don't run out.
Move to the top rack of the grill. Drop temperature down to low. Let cook low and slow for at least an hour and a half. Turn several times and switch positions on the rack to prevent ribs from getting overdone.

If you like to add barbecue sauce, after they've cooked for at least an hour, unwrap and let cook for several minutes to "dry the ribs out a little."

Brush down side one and close lid. Let it sit for several minutes. Brush down side two and remove when sauce is a not too runny.

SMOKER OR PIT DIRECTIONS:
Get your pit or smoker up to 250 degrees. 

Rinse meat 


Strip silver membrane off the back (This will not dissolve if you leave it on!) 

Rub meat down with yellow mustard, covering every part of the meat, even the sides.

Rub meat down with a dry rub. Right now we are hooked on McCormick's Applewood rub.

Cut in half so it fits on the smoker rack easier (SKIP this if you are cooking on a pit with ample room.) 


In an “Ideal” heat smoker, cook for approximately 1-1/2 to 2 hours and check meat. If it’s done, (the color looks good and the meat should be pulling away from the bone) double wrap really tight in aluminum foil and let sit on the smoker until ready to eat. The aluminum keeps the moisture in and the ribs will not dry out. If you like to add BBQ sauce to your ribs, you can brush them down before you wrap them.


Andy makes the best home-made BBQ sauce ever. I did have to date him like 5 years before he would give the recipe to me. It is one of the few recipes I cannot share. I'm surprised he didn't make me include that in the pre-nup! LOL!

Tennessee-Alabama 2011 game. One look at Maggie and you know there was some good eatin' going on!
Hunter was smiling not only because he love's Andy's ribs, but because he's the only Alabama fan in the bunch. Needless to say, the food was good...unlike the final score.